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    Arena Solutions: 2016's Best Practices for NPI and NPD Success
    Arena Solutions: 2016's Best Practices for NPI and NPD Success

    Company: Arena Solutions

    Year: 2015

    2016’s Best Practices for NPI and NPD Success

    What separates New Product Introduction and New Product Development? Adherence to best practices can make your new product development (NPD) and new product introduction (NPI )processes smoother, efficient and more cost effective. Many companies make the mistake of treating manufacturing, new product development (NPD) and newproduct introduction (NPI) as if they are nearly identical. They’re not. Not at all. These processes are interrelated, complementary, and prerequisites for one another. 

    Learn more in Arena Solution's newest White Paper.

    Price: $0.00

     

    Improving Portfolio Decision Making:Marrying PPM Best Practice Processes and Technology to Drive ROI
    Improving Portfolio Decision Making:Marrying PPM Best Practice Processes and Technology to Drive ROI

    Author: Jim Brown
    Company: Tech Clarity
    Year: 2011

    PPM is a discipline that helps companies optimize their product development investments and increase product profitability. PPM practices and tools deliver proven ROI. PPM helps companies develop high-value, strategically aligned portfolios, ensure they are resourced properly, and then execute them effectively to drive profitable revenue. PPM tools also help improve efficiency. To enjoy these benefits, companies need to put in place the right PPM processes, metrics, and tools to improve portfolio decision-making and execution. Getting processes right is important in any systems implementation, but this is even more true in PPM where the goal is to make critical business decisions.

    Price: $0.00

    2nd Annual Product Portfolio Management Benchmark Study
    2nd Annual Product Portfolio Management Benchmark Study

    Company: Planview
    Year: 2010

    How does your product organization compare? How do you measure up to your peers? To your competition? Get the report and find out. More than 900 product development practitioners participated. This study provides insight into key pain points, risks, and a look at the effectiveness of processes for portfolio planning and project execution. 2nd Annual Product Portfolio Management Benchmark Study Commissioned by Planview and conducted by Appleseed Partners and OpenSky Research.

    Price: $0.00

    Beyond Technology Transfer: Quality of Life Impacts from R&D Outcomes
    Beyond Technology Transfer: Quality of Life Impacts from R&D Outcomes

    Authors: Vathsala I Stone; Michelle Lockett; Douglas J Usiak; Sajay Arthanat
    Company: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer
    Year: 2010

    This paper presents methodology and findings from three product efficacy studies that verify the quality of life benefits resulting from prior research, development, and transfer activities. The paper then discusses key lessons learned with implications for product evaluation practice. The studies assessed the quality of three assistive technology (AT) products transferred to market by the University at Buffalo’s Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology Transfer (T2RERC) and their value to consumers with disabilities.

    Price: $0.00

    Chronological Guide for Inventors
    Chronological Guide for Inventors

    Company: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer
    Year: 2014

    The road you are about to travel as an inventor or technology developer is a complex journey. Along the way you will be introduced to new terms, and processes and exposed to a business world that may be totally foreign to you. In this module we hope to answer some of the questions you may have, and provide you with a good, basic knowledge foundation for starting your invention journey. This module walks the reader through a Sample Invention Timeline and provides definitions, examples, and resources along the way.

    Price: $0.00

    Evaluation Resource Guide
    Evaluation Resource Guide

    Authors: Vathsala I Stone; Michelle Lockett; Douglas J Usiak; Sajay Arthanat
    Company: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer
    Year: 2010

    This paper presents methodology and findings from three product efficacy studies that verify the quality of life benefits resulting from prior research, development, and transfer activities. The paper then discusses key lessons learned with implications for product evaluation practice. The studies assessed the quality of three assistive technology (AT) products transferred to market by the University at Buffalo’s Rehabilitation Engineering Research Center on Technology Transfer (T2RERC) and their value to consumers with disabilities.

    Price: $0.00

    Facilitating Technology-Based Knowledge Utilization
    Facilitating Technology-Based Knowledge Utilization

    Company: Planview
    Year: 2010

    This FOCUS presents a framework for integrating two distinct processes: knowledge translation (KT) and technology transfer (TT). The integration permits stakeholders involved in technol­ogy-based research and development activities to identify and coordinate their respective roles, and to optimize the eventual use of research by industry for production purposes.

    Price: $0.00

    Intellectual Property Module
    Intellectual Property Module

    Company: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer
    Year: 2014

    Commercializing technology innovations is a complex process. Many of its milestones and related activities may be unfamiliar to many people looking to develop new technologies. Attempting to commercialize your developments will raise several new issues that must be addressed. One of the most significant issues is recognizing the importance of protecting your intellectual property. To help you better understand the issues involved, this module will suggest some early steps to help protect your intellectual property along with options for how it can be protected.

    Price: $0.00

    Knowledge from Research and Practice on the Barriers and Carriers to Successful Technology Transfer
    Knowledge from Research and Practice on the Barriers and Carriers to Successful Technology Transfer

    Authors: Joseph P. Lane, James A. Leahy
    Company: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer
    Year: 2010

    Historically, the assistive technology (AT) industry is made up of small to medium size companies serving relatively small markets with products characterized as ‘niche’ or ‘orphan’ products. Presenting opportunities to AT companies that are created by outside sources is difficult. Presenting such opportunities to companies serving larger markets is even more difficult. In both cases, transferring new or improved products is fraught with barriers. This paper outlines the critical barriers to brokering efforts between major U.S. university technology transfer offices and U.S. corporations.

    Price: $0.00

    New Product Development: Delivering Evidence of What Works
    New Product Development: Delivering Evidence of What Works

    Authors: Jennifer Flagg, Michelle Lockett, Joseph P. Lane
    Company: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer
    Year: 2010

    New product developers are required to understand and apply a wide variety of processes and tools as they produce new devices or services. Individuals who are seeking alternative or new methods for their process may often be overwhelmed by the amount of academic and practice literature documenting “best practices.” Unfortunately, new product developers may not have sufficient time to invest in exploring alternative strategies, resulting in the repetition of old - possibly outdated - practices. This paper presents the method and preliminary results of a scoping review designed to consolidate information on effective new product development practices into a comprehensive knowledge base. New product developers will enjoy the ease of finding alternative effective practices, while researchers will find value in the consolidated presentation of new product development practices and study methodologies that lend themselves to systematic reviews.

    Price: $0.00

    Targeted Focus Groups in Product Development
    Targeted Focus Groups in Product Development

    Author: James A. Leahy
    Company: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer
    Year: 2010

    The use of targeted focus groups employing purposive sampling, rigorous primary and secondary recruitment screens, and state of the art product and feature demonstrations early in the design process allow new product developers to obtain specific design functions and features for the product being developed directly from the product’s targeted end users. Farther on in the product development process these same targeted, educated, end users are reconvened to review functional prototypes of the new product prior to its initial production run. This paper will present a method that has been repeatedly successfully employed in developing new mainstream consumer products in conjunction with a University based partner organization.

    Price: $0.00

    The Need to Knowledge Model: A Roadmap to Successful Outputs
    The Need to Knowledge Model: A Roadmap to Successful Outputs

    Authors: Jennifer Flagg, Michelle Lockett
    Company: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer
    Year: 2010

    This issue of FOCUS presents the Need to Knowledge (NtK) Model for new product development. The model was designed to encompass all activities from inception of a project through post-launch evaluation to paint a complete picture of the research, development, and production processes. This technical brief explains the details related to the model’s stages and gates, while also introducing four specific opportunities to employ knowledge translation techniques. Focus: A Publication of the National Center for the Dissemination of Disability Research (NCDDR)

    Price: $0.00

    Translating Three States of Knowledge - Discovery, Invention, and Innovation
    Translating Three States of Knowledge - Discovery, Invention, and Innovation

    Authors: Joseph P. Lane; Jennifer Flagg
    Company: Center on Knowledge Translation for Technology Transfer
    Year: 2010

    Stakeholders adopt and use knowledge that has perceived utility, such as a solution to a problem. Achieving a technology-based solution involves three methods that generate knowledge in three states, analogous to the three classic states of matter. Research activity generates discoveries that are intangible and highly malleable like a gas; development activity transforms discoveries into inventions that are moderately tangible yet still malleable like a liquid; and production activity transforms inventions into innovations that are tangible and immutable like a solid.

    Price: $0.00

    DSSP: The shape of things to come
    DSSP: The shape of things to come

    Author: Ping Fu
    Year: 2006

    DSSP is a category name that encompasses multiple technology advances. It describes the ability to use scanning hardware and processing software to digitally capture physical objects and automatically create accurate 3D models with associated structural properties for design, engineering, inspection and custom manufacturing. What digital signal processing (DSP) is to audio, DSSP is to 3D geometry.

    Price: $0.00

    Protecting and Managing your Intellectual Property
    Protecting and Managing your Intellectual Property

    Author: Joe Drury
    Company:
    Kalypso LLC

    It’s not just for legal teams anymore A company’s intellectual property (IP) portfolio is often one of its most valuable and strategic assets. Even though IP creation and reuse is an integral component of an effective innovation process, IP management and oversight typically is relegated to corporate legal groups. These groups tend to focus on protecting what the company owns and enforcing existing licenses. Protection and enforcement are important, but they are only a small piece of effective IP management. Extracting value requires a business‐driven strategy.It’s not just for legal teams anymore A company’s intellectual property (IP) portfolio is often one of its most valuable and strategic assets. Even though IP creation and reuse is an integral component of an effective innovation process, IP management and oversight typically is relegated to corporate legal groups. These groups tend to focus on protecting what the company owns and enforcing existing licenses. Protection and enforcement are important, but they are only a small piece of effective IP management. Extracting value requires a business‐driven strategy.

    Price: $0.00


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